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14 November 2014

WebDAV

I tried a number of things to get a speedy and easy-to-use WebDAV setup and finally settled on using the setup described in Kasun's Tech Blog's Mounting a WebDAV directory in Linux (Ubuntu).

I deviated from the above by leaving /etc/davfs2/davfs2.conf as it is and instead edited the conf file at ~/.davfs2 that magically showed up. I also found a secrets file there where I added credentials. I suspect these were added after the first access I performed, that is, after I did a $ mount . in the mount directory.

07 November 2014

crontab -r


crontab -r is sooo close to crontab -e — exactly one adjacent key to be precise.

And crontab files are stored in /var/spool/cron/crontabs rather than inside the (backed up) /home/mithat directory?

Crap.

21 October 2014

New laptop time

Alas, I think I need to upgrade from my 5+ year old current laptop. I need a dual boot system (with Windows) for teaching, so this means I will need to confront UEFI madness and a whole new slew of hardware compatibility foo--and maybe even a distribution change to one that has solid support for UEFI installs.

Fun times ahead.

23 August 2014

Changing DNS nameservers in aptosid + wpa_gui

This is a corner-case quickie.

I use the Debian-sid derivative aptosid as my main OS along with the blessed-by-aptosid wpa_gui for wlan management. There are reasons I prefer wpa_gui to the aptosid default Ceni--but this is the subject for another post, perhaps.

Unlike other GUI wlan management tools such as wicd or Network Manager, wpa_gui doesn't provide an obvious way to change your DNS nameserver(s). I ran into this problem recently when I was in filter-happy Turkey and the modem+router I bought there had firmware in which the DNS nameserver setting was disabled.

I solved the problem for my machine by editing /etc/dhcp/dhclient.conf. I decommented the line:
#prepend domain-name-servers 127.0.0.1;
and then changed 127.0.0.1 to a comma-separated list of the desired DNS servers, e.g.:
prepend domain-name-servers 208.67.222.222, 208.67.220.220;
(for OpenDNS).

Reboot, and a
$ dig google.com
showed that it worked.

I can't say it'll work on every machine, but it worked for me.

02 June 2014

The first Tizen phone

https://www.tizen.org/

TechCrunch, Ars Technica, Gizmodo, and The Verge today have sizable articles discussing the the first Tizen-powered phone to hit the market: the Samsung Z.

The range of tone and angles in the articles is fascinating. They also aptly demonstrate my third law of the Internet: For every opinion, there is an equal and opposite opinion. For example, The Verge says, "The phone will have a major disadvantage right out of the gate--[it] won't have access to the vast ecosystem of Android apps that has been built up over recent years." But TechCrunch reports, "The Z will include access to a Tizen app store, which means buyers can expect a few thousand native apps. [The] Open Mobile application compatibility later [sic] will enable the handset to run Android apps too."

I wasn't expecting anyone would actually ever bring a Tizen-powered phone to market, so I haven't been following development of this open-source mobile OS. But I will now be doing so and am wishing the phone well.